For Your Consideration: Our 2013 Award-Eligible Contributors List

We published two books in 2013: Fish (edited by Carrie Cuinn and KV Taylor) and Bibliotheca Fantastica (edited by Don Pizarro). We also published a novella, Inedible Sins, and launched the first issue of our new speculative fiction magazine, Lakeside Circus.

Of course, we have to mention that both of our anthology covers for 2013 were drawn by the amazing Galen Dara, who should certainly be nominated for all of the awards this year.

BF FINAL cover_v2_full cover_sm

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In addition, the authors we’ve published are eligible for various awards either for the stories we presented to you or for other work. We posted a PDF reading copy of Colleen Anderson’s “The Book With No End” here, since she’s on the Bram Stoker Award Preliminary Ballot in the “Superior Achievement in Short Fiction” category. But there are more!

Polenth Blake, whose story “Thwarting the Fiends” was a favorite from Fish, also has a novelette out: “By Means of Clockwork Selection”. For more details, go here.

Nathan Crowder’s story “Cold Comfort of Silver Lake” is in Blood Rites: an Introduction to Horror, on the preliminary Stoker ballot for anthologies. Crowder can also be found in Cthulhurotica (2011).

Sam Fleming, who wrote the excellent “What the Water Gave Her” for Fish, also wrote “When Shepherds Dream of Electric Sheep” for the Looking Landwards anthology by NewCon Press. Find out more about Fleming here.

Gabrielle Harboway, who appeared in Cthulhurotica, is Nebula-eligible for “Blood Magic,” published in Witches, Stitches & Bitches from Evil Girlfriend Media. The story is online for free in the SFWA short story forum, for the consideration of SFWA members. Read more about her work here.

Ken Liu, who wrote “How Do You Know if a Fish is Happy?” for Fish and ” ” for IN SITU (2012), shares his favorite publications of 2013 and a list of his eligible stories here.

Please also see our list of award-eligible authors from Lakeside Circus, here.

Colleen Anderson’s “The Book With No End”

Colleen Anderson’s “The Book With No End” (from Bibliotheca Fantastica, ed. by Don Pizarro) made the Stoker 2013 preliminary ballot! To celebrate, we’ve made it free to read online for a limited time.

Eligible for the “Superior Achievement in Short Fiction” award, Anderson’s story is definitely horror, yet perfectly fit within the confines of Bibliotheca Fantastica, a book about books. Neon: a Literary Magazine said the story, “Starts innocently enough, but quickly becomes dark and deeply unsettling.”

Yes, it does. Anderson’s titular book is written in blood and sacrifice, ancient and obfuscated, and the secrets it offers up are not to be sought lightly.

Download the PDF here: Anderson.BookWithNoEnd.DaganBooks  (It’s set up in the same format as the print book; we recommend you read it in the “two pages” view for best effect.)

Read an interview with Anderson here.

Neon, A Literary Magazine, Reviews BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA

Says reviewer Christopher Frost:

I was initially sceptical of Bibliotheca Fantastica, the recent anthology of short stories published by Dagan Books. The collection is, to put it simply, a book about books. Each of the twenty stories to be found between its covers involves a book, tome, scripture, scroll or tablet of some kind.

Don Pizarro’s introduction does a good job of touching on some of the reasons why books are such a potentially interesting subject – yet it still left me the tiniest bit unconvinced that it would be anything but a dry and interminable read. Thankfully this was not the case. The stories ranged widely, and included some stunningly original takes on the concept of a book.

In fact each story was so wildly unique and intriguing….

Read the rest here.

Find the post on their Facebook page and “like” or tweet it to be entered for a chance to win an ebook of Bibliotheca Fantastica.

The Qwillery ask BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA authors about the power of books

When we put together the fantasist anthology, Bibliotheca Fantastica, we asked ourselves, “What’s so magical about books, anyway?” David Sklar, Gord Sellar, Michael J. DeLuca, A.C. Wise,  Garry Kilworth, S.J. Hirons, Ray Vukcevich, Tina Connolly, and Andrew S. Fuller, answered that question for us, over at The Qwillery:

Books are time travel. They’re telepathy. They’re the seance, the ansible, the summoning ritual, the oracle, the visionary dream. Reading makes another person’s ideas our own, for better or worse, as different, far away or long ago as that other person might be. The connection isn’t perfect–what magic is? But what’s lost in the translation from one mind to the page and back into another’s leaves room for the creativity that makes the next book possible, and the next. If only we could read them all. Michael J. DeLuca, author of “Other Palimpsests”

My favorite and most heartbreaking dreams are the ones where I’m in a library or old junk shop and I stumble on a book by a beloved author that I didn’t know existed. I know where this comes from–when I was little I was obsessed with the Wizard of Oz. I thought there was only one book, but then in my Scholastic flyer from school I boggled as I saw an advertisement for #2. In our local bookstore sometime later I found 3, and eventually all the L. Frank Baum ones through 14. Several years later I was in the Topeka library and the same thrilling shock ran through me as I found the ones by Ruth Plumly Thompson. Each of these moments is incised in my memory. The books themselves were magical, but the unexpected discovery that you could, in fact, go back to Oz (or Narnia, or Green Gables, or or or) was always the real magic. Tina Connolly, author of “Paperheart”

We are matter that looks at and thinks about the universe and then tells stories. How that all works and why we should make up stories are deep mysteries, but that’s what we do, and while it might not really be magic, it is wonderful. As we change in the coming ages, if we survive, the way we tell those stories might change, too. When we augment those most complicated of things, our brains, new art forms will probably arise. At some deep level, though, I think it will still be narrative, because that’s who we are. We struggle to make sense of things and then we say stuff. Some of the most interesting things we say are collected in objects called “books.” Ray Vukcevich, author of “The Go-Between”

Read the rest here.

SF Signal interviews Don Pizarro about BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA

SF Signal introduces their new interview with author and editor Don Pizarro by calling our latest anthology “the excellent Bibliotheca Fantastica (see their review). With questions that range from the concept of books as an idea to the thrills and dangers of the book-worlds our authors created, the interview explores a little bit of what an editor thinks after the book is put together…

HM: As I read the stories, I could sense an unwritten warning about the power of books. When it comes to books with magical properties, what’s more dangerous – the book or the reader?

DP: That’s a false dichotomy I think, and here’s why. Think about the phrase, “Guns don’t kill people….” There are three ways to finish it: (a) “people do,” (b) “bullets do,” or (c) “Actually no, guns do kill people.” However you answer it, if you take away any one of those elements (Let’s swap: (a) the reader, (b) the book’s content, (c) the book-as-object), there just isn’t as much danger as there is when all the elements are combined.

Combine them, and the danger is practically limitless!

Read the rest here.

Tor.com is giving away signed copies of BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA & we’re celebrating with a sale!

A book about books, full of enchanting, terrifying, and magical tales: sounds like the perfect gift for All Hallow’s Read! We have three copies of Bibliotheca Fantastica, edited by Don Pizarro and available now from Dagan Books, and one of them could be yours.

With 20 stories from writers like Tina Connolly, A.C. Wise, and Michael J. DeLuca, and a cover by Hugo Award-winning artist Galen Dara, this anthology is a lovely addition to any bibliophile’s bookshelf.

Comment in the post to enter!

And to celebrate, we’re putting our Amazon stock on sale:

Bibliotheca Fantastica is now $12.99 – but Amazon has it marked down further, to $11.69 (and it’s Prime eligible).

FISH is also 12.99, but marked down to $11.69 (and it’s Prime eligible).

Cthulhurotica, also $12.99 from now on, is currently only $11.55! (And also has FREE two-day shipping for Prime customers.)

New review of BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA now up at SF Signal

Says SF Signal:

Each story offers its own interpretation of the central theme; subtle work as well as more head-on approaches are represented; imagination and creative freedom are king.

Rated 4.5 of 5 stars!

Of special note were stories by Garry Kilworth, Lydia S. Gray, A.C. Wise, Colleen Anderson, J.S. Bangs, Michael Skeet, Tina Connolly, Andrew S. Fuller, Megan Arkenberg, David Sklar, and Ray Vukcevich. The reviewer’s favorite was Todd T. Castillo’s “Where Love is Written”, about which he says:

It’s a stripped-down, but heartfelt tale and its the emotional honesty that hits very hard. Often the simplest things cause the most astonishment.

and in conclusion, says about the book:

All in all, even the most fanatic of bibliophiles will suffer an overdose in the most positive connotation of the word. In the end, that’s what you need to understand about Bibliotheca Fantastica.

Read the rest of the review here.

Want to read Bibliotheca Fantastica now? Our ebooks offer instant download and an immediate chance to read.

Buy the epub file here, mobi (which also works on your Kindle) here, or PDF here, for only $4.99 each. Always DRM-free! Or you can buy a bundle of Bibliotheca Fantastica in all three digital formats, for only $6.99 (here)

Haven’t read FISH yet? Buy FISH and Bibliotheca Fantastica in a bundle together for $8.98… less than the cost of buying them separately.  Epub or mobi.

If you buy your ebooks exclusively through Amazon, then please go here to purchase a copy of Bibliotheca Fantastica for only $4.99.

Barnes and Noble has it here, and Kobo has it here (both as an epub for their readers). Weightless also offers the DRM-free epub or mobi here.

However you buy it, Bibliotheca Fantastica is a

guaranteed treat for the readers who are infatuated with books as physical objects as the stories help you rediscover why you fell in love with the written word and the act of reading in the first place.

Just ask SF Signal.